Tag Archives: Crater Lake Institute

Crater Lake Institute website – A Side Project

I’ve posted about Crater Lake Institute before, but we reached a sort-of milestone the past couple of months and I wanted to share. As a side project unrelated to painting, I build and maintain the website for Crater Lake Institute, a non-profit that helps Crater Lake National Park located in southern Oregon. This is a great bunch of guys who used to work for the park and now supply an amazing resource, the best single web-based library about the park – and I’ve supplied art, publication services and lots of work building out this website to the organization.

Winter at Headquarters, photo by Ranger Dave Grimes, March 16, 2016

This past three months, we’ve now reached web visitation levels worthy of mention. We’ve been averaging over 600,000 hits and over 80,000 individual visitors per month. That’s a LOT of eyeballs – at least I think so. This past year we’ve partnered with REI Trails, NPSHistory.com and others to broaden our connections and I’m fairly proud of what’s happening with all of it. Thanks, Ron and everyone else at CLI for involving me. It’s been great fun and I sure know a lot about this amazing park because of it.

Watchman Peak at Sunrise, March 17, 2016 by Ranger Dave Grimes

Thanks for reading this week.
Larry Eifert

Here’s the blog on the web. And here’s my Facebook fan page. I post lots of other stuff there.

Click here to go to our main website – with jigsaw puzzles, prints, interpretive portfolios and lots of other stuff.

Nancy’s web portfolio of stunning photography

And here to go to Virginia Eifert’s website. Her books are now becoming available as Amazon Kindle books.

Crater Lake Institute – a side project

CLI-home-page
Front page of Crater Lake Institute’s website

I’ve not posted anything about this small side project, but it’s far enough along for me to brag a bit. For the past year, I’ve been rebuilding the Crater Lake Institute’s web presence. Currently, it stands at 3588 pages and counting. That’s right, 3588 pages.

Who and what? Crater Lake Institute is a group that works to enhance Crater Lake National Park, Oregon in many ways. They’ve collected more historic stuff about this park than anyone, bought equipment for the nationally-recognized Ski Patrol, commissioned over a dozen murals of my art for many places around the West, hosted rim-side interpretive walks, created publications about the park no one else has even considered doing. The board (that I now am on) is a bunch of retired NPS folks, amazing in their knowledge of this beautiful place.

I was approached to rebuild a very aging and almost dead website – but little did I realize how massive this thing was. In fact, it’s the largest digital and free collection of Crater Lake material anywhere. Huge sections are here on what to do in the park, Geology, Natural History, Oral Histories, Art, Weather, a giant collection of historic photos, stories, newspaper accounts going back into the 1800’s. I’ve also added my art here and there, sprinkled it with magic dust and – Oh, I could go on!

Because of this, the never-tiring park-painter has learned more about Crater Lake than probably any park I’ve ever worked on. Just ask me about the hand grenade death in the 80’s, the secret trails few park people even know about, the inside scoop on more stuff than my little brain can handle. And the best part is that I’ve gotten to know founder and board president Ron Mastrogiuseppe, fondly known as M13, one of the most genuine and interesting park people I’ve come across.

CLI-home-page-2
More of the front page

Thanks for reading this week.

Spend a moment and look at the site – then tell me what you think. http://craterlakeinstitute.com
Larry Eifert

Here’s the blog on the web.  And here’s my Facebook fan page. I post lots of other stuff there.

Click here to go to our main website – with jigsaw puzzles, prints, interpretive portfolios and lots of other stuff.

Nancy’s web portfolio of beautiful photographs

And Click here to go to Virginia Eifert’s website. Her books are now becoming available as Amazon Kindle books.

Crater Lake NP New Puzzle Has Arrived

Whitebark-Pines-of-Crater-Lake-1000pc

Yesterday we received a shipment of new puzzles for spring. This is the first 1000-piece puzzle we’ve produced in years, and it’s fun for us to see the bigger image, bigger box, bigger everything. Finished size is 20″x 28″, it has an interlocking border, and it includes a reference poster inside. You can order it here.

Eifert-Crater-1000-boxback

The box back, with lots of great info and species key.

Eifert-Crater-1000-boxtop

We’ve also included a free poster with reference key and a bunch of information about the whitebark pines at Crater Lake that are in serious trouble due to Climate Change, an introduced pathogen and the ravages of bark beetles. It’s our way to cram some great interpretation and nature into one product – and it should also be a fun one to put together. Below is the poster that comes with it.

Whitebark-Pine-Crater-Lake-box-insert

Order this puzzle simply by clicking here to go to our cart. $18.95 plus shipping at our cost.

This was funded by the good folks at Crater Lake Institute and Foundation. Thanks, Ron. I think it’s a great puzzle.

Thanks for reading this week.
Larry Eifert

Here’s the blog on the web.  And here’s my Facebook fan page. I post lots of other stuff there.

Click here to go to our main website – with jigsaw puzzles, prints, interpretive portfolios and lots of other stuff.

Nancy’s web portfolio of beautiful photographs

And Click here to go to Virginia Eifert’s website. Her books are now becoming available as Amazon Kindle books.

Progress on the Yellowstone Project

Yellowstone Progress 4

    Several of you asked to see progress photos of this project. So, let’s try it.

 

 

And here’s the progress over the past few days. I’ll put the most current at the top. For me, acrylic landscape painting is a back-to-front process, meaning I tend to paint the horizon first, then work my way to the foreground. It creates a cleaner painting situation for these larger images, but this painting is actually fairly small for me, about four feet on the horizontal – just big enough to get some serious detail, yet small enough to lug around.

Progress-2

    I often paint some section out fairly completely to see how it’s going to look, like this area near the bear. THE BEAR: notice it’s on all fours here, and at the top it’s standing. I might go back to this one – just not sure yet. It seems to be going much slower than usual, but there’s been lots of other stuff going on here. Might be a good thing as I’ve always been yelled at for being too quick to completely think these complex projects out.

Progress1

Here’s the original sketch I posted first on October 10th.

Whitebark-Sketch-vs2

It’s a complex painting, but the type I really relish. I just love standing here with my paint brush and imagining this scene is real, that I’m really here in the meadow looking at all that’s going on. I dream about it.

Thanks for reading this week.
Larry Eifert

Here’s the blog on the web.  And here’s my Facebook fan page. I post lots of other stuff there.

Click here to go to our main website – with jigsaw puzzles, prints, interpretive portfolios and lots of other stuff.

Nancy’s web portfolio of beautiful photographs

And Click here to go to Virginia Eifert’s website. Her books are now becoming available as Amazon Kindle books.

Yellowstone Climate Change mural #2

Hot-Spring-sketch-vs1

This enlarges in your browser so you can see details.

Midway Geyser Basin and the Grand Prismatic Hot Spring, Yellowstone National Park

This is a second and very different sketch than the one posted two weeks ago.

    There are still critters to add, bison crossing near the hot spring, a few birds and maybe a bat, but it’s essentially complete. The idea for this one developed as a visual counter-punch to the first sketch I drew two weeks ago of Whitebark Pines at Yellowstone. That one shows high-elevation Climate Change effects to the park, while this sketch shows thermal features and lodgepole pine forests (where most visitors go).  Both show all the critters and plants that will be effected by Climate Change, change that is already seriously in progress.

    Below is one of my reference photos of the Grand Prismatic Hot Spring, largest hot spring in America. The sketch shows a burned-out forest and lots of diseased trees caused by warmer winters. Warmer winters allow pine bark beetles and then blister rust to ravage these forests. Warmer and drier summers then mean bigger wild fires, a possible lowering of the summer water table – and many changes in wildlife populations. Stay tuned, the first painting is already underway. These two are funded by the Crater Lake Institute, but more like them are being planned through the National Park Service Climate Change Response Program. It’s a bold series of paintings I’m thrilled to be involved with.

Grand_Prismatic_Spring_and_Midway_Geyser_Basin_Yellowstone_NP

Thanks for reading this week.
Larry Eifert

Here’s the blog on the web.  And here’s my Facebook fan page. I post lots of other stuff there.

Click here to go to our main website – with jigsaw puzzles, prints, interpretive portfolios and lots of other stuff.

Nancy’s web portfolio of beautiful photographs

And Click here to go to Virginia Eifert’s website. Her books are now becoming available as Amazon Kindle books.

Yellowstone – Whitebark Pines Ecosystem Mural

Whitebark-Sketch-vs2

Click on the image and it’ll enlarge in your browser for better viewing – and this one deserves it!

 

A new project is in the works – funded by the Crater Lake Institute. Here’s the sketch awaiting comments and maybe a few changes, but I can already see it’ll be a grand painting. And this is one of two large murals I’m working on at once. I’ll have the second sketch for you next week (I hope, if my fingers don’t give out). They’re both about Climate Change and the Yellowstone area.

 

    This is a ecosystem in great peril, thanks to us: Climate Change is causing mountain pine beetles to over-live usually colder winters. Then there’s an introduced fungus called white pine blister rust that is believed to be native to Asia or Europe and was subsequently introduced to North America by us – and put the three together and you have the recipe for real disaster. Thousands upon thousands of these important trees are either dying or are already standing stark and ghostly against the Yellowstone sky, ghost forests – and most of the critters represented in the sketch rely on this tree for survival, for food, shelter and their way of life.

Wally Macfarlane

YES: those are dead trees! Photo from University of Utah researcher Wally Macfarlane. 

    So, the sketch: The big background peak was patterned after Electric Peak along the northern border of Yellowstone, and will show fresh fall snow – but snow is a factor in this story too. Warmer winters mean less summer ground water, and the elk birth rates are already declining there because of the lack of proper summer grass to produce milk for their young. Below the peak, the whitebark pine forests show as dying or dead with brown-red needles by the millions. A back-country hot springs to the right of the grizzly places it over the Yellowstone Caldera. Aspen are in full fall yellow on the far right side, another species in danger. Aspen are important because they are one of the few hardwoods growing here, but they need summer water to survive – oops, that too is declining. I could go on, but you get the ‘picture’.

    Art should stimulate discussion, and that’s what this is all about. I’m excited to be a part of it. Global Climate Change is the single most important threat to our well-being – as well as the health of all the creatures and plants we are now responsible for. It wasn’t this way before humans learned to alter the planet they live on, but now it’s up to us to make sure they have a place to live. Onward – I say to my painting arm. What else could matter more?

Thanks for reading this week. Stay tuned for the painting!

Larry Eifert

Here’s the blog on the web.  And here’s my Facebook fan page. I post lots of other stuff there.

Click here to go to our main website – with jigsaw puzzles, prints, interpretive portfolios and lots of other stuff.

Nancy’s web portfolio of beautiful photographs

And Click here to go to Virginia Eifert’s website. Her books are now becoming available as Amazon Kindle books.