Tag Archives: Sol Duc River

Salmon Cascades – A New Project in the Works

Salmon Cascades in Olympic National Park. Not a big drop, but always beautiful. Stuff goes on here!

Progress shot at the moment. More soon.

Olympic National Park has always been very supportive of my painting-mania, and this project has been years in the making. We both just had to wait for funding to appear, and it finally did.

I already have 24 of my paintings along the Sol Duc Road in various wayside exhibits and panels – drive along, pull over and see art! But this project required my GoPro underwater camera for references. I have always wondered what this place looks like to a salmon, so here it is:

And so the sketch shows the underwater stream bed just below the cascades and rocky walls, and of course, the painting will have a run of Sol Duc coho, females being herded by the big guys, all waiting for strength to attempt a jump in their upstream journey. We’ve seen this ourselves and I’ve stood just to the left watching them circle.

And then I put this into the same design template as some of the other panels up and down the road. Janet at the park will write the text and she’s always so brilliant at this. We both came up with the title completely independent of each other.

Stay tuned, more to come on this probably next week.

Thanks for reading this week.
Larry Eifert

Here’s the blog on the web. And here’s my Facebook fan page. I post lots of other stuff there.

Click here to go to our main website – with jigsaw puzzles, prints, interpretive portfolios and lots of other stuff.

Nancy’s web portfolio of stunning photography

And here to go to Virginia Eifert’s website. Her books are now becoming available as Amazon Kindle books.

Dipper on the North Fork Returns

North-Fork-Dipper

  • This is not a new painting, but this week we sold a large custom print of it. The painting itself is in our private collection, just because I liked it, and now I think I like it even more.  There’s a quality about the river’s transparency, of water-carved rocks glowing from within – and that reflected glow on the dipper. OR, maybe I like it because of the memory of the moment. That’s important now as spring slowly arrives here and I wish for warmer hiking days. We have 6″ high nettles up in our woods, daffs higher than that, the willows are out – and it surely is an early spring, but not earlier enough for us.
  • That moment: North Fork of the Sol Duc River in Olympic National Park. Hike up and over a little ridge, ford the river up to your crotch in blindingly-cold ice melt – and you’re on a truly glorious and empty trail for miles. In places there are huge water-carved boulders (where we saw this dipper dipping), and in August it’s a grand place for skinny dipping for sure. Thanks, Kevin, for buying the print so these memories could return.
  • I think this is why I’m just a painter of life’s memories. I can paint pretty good non-objective images and commissioned fictitious murals of some detail, but when I look back at all the paintings through the years, I get the best emotional charge from painting experiences from the times (good or bad) in my life. I think of the moment, the experience surrounding that moment, who I was with, what it smelled like, felt like, sounded like.

Thanks for reading this week.
Larry Eifert

Here’s the blog on the web.  And here’s my Facebook fan page. I post lots of other stuff there.

Click here to go to our main website – with jigsaw puzzles, prints, interpretive portfolios and lots of other stuff.

Nancy’s web portfolio of beautiful photographs

And Click here to go to Virginia Eifert’s website. Her books are now becoming available as Amazon Kindle books.

A Light in the Forest

There’s a 16″ image on the web to view – just click on the painting.

“Light in the Forest” is an original acrylic painting on canvas, 24″ x 48″. This started  this week with the reference photo below that I took at Sol Duc Valley in Olympic National Park. A droopy trillium flower, a few non-flowering False Lily-of-the-Valley plants, some sword ferns – but I liked the idea of a big shaft of bright sun illuminating a lush springtime old-growth forest. I think I need to work on this just a bit more, but I’m close to getting there. It may be a tad over the top with details, but I couldn’t help but to add a calypso orchid, just because it’s my favorite forest flower – and a Pacific wren, one of my favorite forest birds. These little guys are only about 3 inches long, yet sing an astoundingly-loud sizzling song that seems to go on forever. The poor little bird had its name changed a few years ago when some new genetic testing reveled the birds here on the West Coast are different than the eastern birds. No respect!

 

 

This is the original painting, NOT a print. If you’re interested in purchasing this, contact us.

 

 

We’re offering “Light in the Forest” for $1200 with our custom-built hemlock frame. Shipping will add a bit more, but since it’s on canvas, it’s light.

Email us for details.

Thanks for reading this week.
Larry Eifert

Click here to go to the online blog this was to. Or follow me on Facebook here.

Click here to go to our main website – packed with jigsaw puzzles, prints, interpretive portfolios and lots of other stuff.

Click here to check out what Nancy’s currently working on with her photography.

Click here to go to Virginia Eifert’s website. Her books are now becoming available as Amazon Kindle books.

North Fork Sol Duc River – Golden Light

(this should enlarge if you click on it)
Anyone who has followed these posts will recognize the river’s name, because I’ve painted images here before. And you may know the name, but I’ll bet few of you have actually hiked beside it or stuck your toes in it – but you should. The Sol Duc is one of those glorious Olympic rivers and runs unblocked for about 75 miles, from the alpine to where it joins the Quillayute just short of the sea. The North Fork is roadless and entirely within Olympic National Park, and has only a trail beside it – and it’s sweet and pure magic to meander among these huge trees and sculptured bedrock. It’s not one of those raging torrents like the Elwha or Hoh with gigantic piles of messy torn out trees blocking every bend, but a very refined and elegant bit of water you just don’t want to leave at the end of a hike. The catch? There’s a half-mile climb between your car and the first ford – a little hump that weeds out the weak. I think there used to be a log bridge, but that’s long gone and in my mind it’s a good thing. Keeps the trail isolated enough so you’ll have it to yourself. We just slip on river sandals and in a minute we were on the trail to paradise, listening to the sounds of falling water and breeze high in the canopy.

This painting is a remembrance of a fine day of hiking. It was time to leave, but there was this one final moment when the sun highlighted the last bend just before the ford. It was a moment to dream about.

This ORIGINAL painting is varnished acrylic on linen canvas, 16″ x 20″ and $790 unframed.
I have some nice wood or gold frames for another $30 and shipping adds just a bit more depending on your zone or if you take the frame. This is the original painting, NOT a print.
Email us for details.

Thanks for reading this week.
Larry Eifert

Click here to go to the online blog this was to.

Click here to go to our main website – packed with jigsaw puzzles, prints, interpretive portfolios and lots of other stuff.

Click here to check out what Nancy’s currently working on with her photography.

Pulse of the River Wayside Panel

(image should enlarge with a click)

We’ve been away on a field trip to the Shulman Bristlecone Pine Grove near Bishop, CA for some new paintings soon to come – so I don’t have a fresh painting this week. But it’s glorious Fall here now, with the maples and alders loosing their leaves – so here’s a wayside panel I just received the digital file for. It’s already installed, but I had never seen this in its final digital form.

This one is installed at the same location it was modeled after, right along the river. As you can see in the photo, snow was still on the ground when I did the field research, but along the way the painting turned into a Fall scene with bronzed vine maple and returning salmon. Paintings can do that, while photography has a more difficult time – which means I still have a great job because of it.

Thanks for reading this week.
Larry Eifert

Click here to go to the online blog this was to.

Click here to go to our main website – packed with jigsaw puzzles, prints, interpretive portfolios and lots of other stuff.

Click here to check out what Nancy’s currently working on with her photography.

The Sound of Falling Water

Sure, the Northwest has all those  grand peaks, glaciers and giant trees, ocean beaches and alpine lakes, but for me it’s these little seasonal waterfalls that always get me going.

I think it’s the fact they’re always different, always changing – and mostly temporary. As winter snows melt, hundreds of valleys, cliff faces and forest slopes echo with a cacophony of pure and cold rushing melt water, all of it seemingly too eager to get down to the sea. This is a very noisy place, and I really don’t care if I sound anthropomorphic or maybe sentimental – for me, these waterfalls are alive. Most of the time these little streams cross our trail under a little bridge or log instead of our having to slog through it, and this gives me a place to study the motion, blur, colors and mossy rocks inthe spray zone. Most of these little channels are dry by mid-August, but, because we’ve had a cool and wet past few weeks, they’ve begun again in earnest. Sure it rains a bit up here, but this is what you get. It’s not all that bad.

So, I’m not there at the moment. And neither are you. Look at the painting again and let’s pretend we’re standing on that nearby log. Close your eyes and listen. Hear it? The rush of water over rocks, a blur of sounds, the smell of nearby warm hemlock in sun. I live for this stuff!

This acrylic is 14″ x 20″ on paperboard and is offered  for $790 unframed, but if you lean on me I’ll toss in a nice frame to boot.
Shipping adds just a bit more depending on your zone or if you take the frame. This is the original painting, NOT a print.
Email us for details.

Thanks for reading this week.
Larry Eifert

Click here to go to the online blog this was to.

Click here to go to our main website – packed with jigsaw puzzles, prints, interpretive portfolios and lots of other stuff.

Click here to check out what Nancy’s currently working on with her photography.

Art in the Old-growth

(Click to enlarge so you can read the text by Janet Scharf, Olympic NP)

‘An art gallery in the woods,’ that’s what I like to call these paintings.

Thanks to the kind folks at the park, I now have 24 paintings, well, reproductions of them, scattered along the road in Olympic National Park’s Sol Duc Valley. This one was one of the first, and until recently I didn’t have a digital file of it for my portfolio. The fabricator finally sent it to me, so now I’m passing it along to all of you. It tells the story of the unseen-by-us happenings in the old-growth when the sun goes down, how all sorts of critters appear and carry on their lives when we’ve all gone home for the day. In the foreground, a flying squirrel is diggin’ ‘shrooms and upon hearing the rustle of forest duff, a northern spotted owl begins its predatory plunge from a high perch. The black-tailed deer is browsing oxalis and isn’t aware of the mountain lion’s stealthy approach. And the marbled murrelet is coming home on the last flight of the day, returning to it’s mossy nest with a load of herring for it’s chick from the distant Pacific 20 miles away.

I’ve always liked the idea of using my paintings to present an interpretive idea or story about nature. I learn about it. I paint it. I pass it along to the next guy. Outdoor fabrication technology is pretty good these days, so this panel will last for decades unless a 500,000-pound tree falls on it (which has happened). I love the thought of a car full of visitors driving up this beautiful road, eyes open in wonder at the scenery and pulling off to read this wayside panel – and suddenly they’re immersed in a painting telling a story about nature they never knew about. I think art should teach and inspire – and then move the viewer to positive future actions. Is this art? I’d say it is.

Thanks for reading this week.
Larry Eifert

Click here to go to the online blog this was posted to.

Click here to go to our main website – packed with jigsaw puzzles, prints, interpretive portfolios and lots of other stuff.

Click here to check out what Nancy’s currently working on with her photography. She has new work up of her garden after a morning rain.

Dipper on the North Fork

A Larger Painting today.We’ve added some names from Gallery Nine in Port Townsend, so if you’re getting this email and don’t know what it is, this is the weekly art-blog for painter-writer Larry Eifert. Don’t want it? Just unsubscribe below. I sent it about once a week.

North Fork of the Sol Duc River. Now this is a special place. No one goes here because the trail doesn’t GO anywhere and today’s peak-bagging goal-oriented hikers  hate that. No lake, no peak, no stunning overlook – just miles and miles of stately old-growth forest and rushing river awaiting. Elk, deer, salmon – and lots of dippers like this one.

The Sol Duc is about 70 miles west of here in Olympic National Park. After hiking over a hill for about a mile from the Sol Duc road, we put on our water shoes and forded the river that was up to our thighs. Cold – but absolutely delightful – and these two natural barriers are what also help to keep most hikers out. On the other side, with hiking boots back on, we ambled up the trail beside the river. Sometimes we were down on bedrock, other times up in maple glades festooned with hanging club moss and occasionally up onto deeply forested benches with enormous trees. There’s a lot of bedrock basalt exposed along the river, creating punchbowl effects and some very deep pools (like the painting). It’s a place to just sit and listen to the endless harmonies of water over stones, wind high in the 300′ hemlocks – and think about how lucky it is we still  have these places.

Click the images to enlarge them.

This original painting is varnished acrylic on linen canvas, 22″ x 28″ and is offered for $790 unframed.
We can custom frame this for you in any style you’d like using our wholesale framing discounts (meaning you’ll save about 75% of what a normal custom framer would charge).  This is the original painting, NOT a print. However, we offer custom prints as large as 50 inches on the shortest side.
Email us for details in your interested.

Thanks for reading this week.
Larry Eifert

Click here to go to the online blog this was published to.

Click here to go to our main website – packed with jigsaw puzzles, prints, interpretive portfolios and lots of other stuff.

Click here to check out what Nancy’s currently working on with her photography.

Salmon Cascades – Olympic National Park

Salmon-Cascades
I spent the entire week drawing concept sketches for a new project, and I couldn’t have imagined a more fun time. And since I have graphite all over the place –  drawings for 130 running FEET of new murals and am completely disorganized, I thought I’d just post this finished painting here instead of showing you the sketches. Maybe it’ll calm me down. When I get the pencil drawings pasted together in some sort of publishable form, I’ll post them.
This painting is of Salmon Cascades – just west of us in Olympic National Park. It’s a favorite for many locals, because in Fall huge salmon come right up along the rock cliff on the left as the big fish prepare to jump the cascades. You can be within two feet of a very powerful fish waiting for just the right moment to make the leap, and it’s pretty thrilling. In late afternoon, the sun comes around to illuminate the mist from the falls, bathing the entire area in silver light.
This painting is acrylic on board, 12″ x 20″ and we’re offering it for $700 unframed. Email us for details. Click the image to enlarge.
Thanks for reading this week.
Larry Eifert

Click here to go to the online blog this was to.

Click here to go to our main website – packed with jigsaw puzzles, prints, interpretive portfolios and lots of other stuff.

Click here to check out what Nancy’s currently working on with her photography.