Tag Archives: Alders

Light in the Meadows

I painted this a few months ago, but larger stuff kept getting on the weekly blog. I painted this because I was struck by the misty air here that almost made the ground and creek glow. On the far edge of the flood plain the alders were really lighting up, like a spotlight had been trained on them, but in a few seconds this all changed when a cloud moved over us and changed the light from warm to cool. Gone, but I still remember the moment. It’s what paintings are all about, chasing those glorious moments of memory. Too many giant paintings have been coming out of this studio in the past few months and I’m sure ready for some of these “moments” here.

 

This ORIGINAL painting is varnished acrylic on linen canvas, 9″ x 12″ and $140 unframed.
Custom frame makes it a total of $170 and shipping adds just a bit more depending on your zone or if you take the frame. This is the original painting, NOT a print.
Email us for details.

 

On a more ‘retail’ note, the website is finally coming back together and by the rate of people buying Christmas stuff, it seems to be working Okay. I’m adding the prints and puzzles, journals and stuff every day, so stay tuned for more as the experience gets richer. http://larryeifert.com/shop is the portal, but you can also get to it from the website simply at http://larryeifert.com

Thanks for reading this week.
Larry Eifert

Click here to go to the online blog this was to.

Click here to go to our main website – packed with jigsaw puzzles, prints, interpretive portfolios and lots of other stuff.

Click here to check out what Nancy’s currently working on with her photography.

This Guy Also Lives Here

This is the last post of the year for me, so I want to thank everyone for all your  comments, thoughts and, of course, purchases. While it’s not a-painting-a-day blog like some of my friends, I’ve still managed at least one a week for a lot of years now. It’s been a great way to stay connected.

Downy woodpeckers live here with us in our little patch of forest. They tend to prefer mixed woods with conifers and deciduous trees like our cedars and hemlocks, maples and alders. Here they’ve they set up housekeeping in some of our carefully preserved dead snags we leave standing just for this purpose. We see them on our suet feeder all year where I get up-close and personal views of how they look. This one’s a red-topped male I know well.

The downy is amazingly similar to the hairy woodpecker we have here too – almost identical except a tad larger. They’re actually not very closely related, making the two a great example of convergent evolution in which two separate species that live in the same place and do the same thing evolve, over time, to look the same. When I learn this, I immediately want to know how long this took, and what did the two birds look like originally before they migrated into these great Northwestern forests. Don’t you want to know?

This ORIGINAL painting is varnished acrylic on linen canvas, 8″ x 10″ and $120 unframed. A custom wood frame makes it a total of $150 and shipping adds just a bit more depending on your zone or if you take the frame. This is the original painting, NOT a print.
Email us for details.

Thanks for reading this week.
Larry Eifert

Click here to go to the online blog this was to.

Click here to go to our main website – packed with jigsaw puzzles, prints, interpretive portfolios and lots of other stuff.

Click here to check out what Nancy’s currently working on with her photography.

Red Alder Leaves

Leaves, leaves, leaves.

That’s what my life is about these days – especially big-leafed maple leaves. About the size of a dinner plate (some are platter-sized), our enormous southside maple STILL has a few thousand leaves to drop. And the red alders have barely begun to even think about it. Don’t get me started. I love this forest place of ours, but this time of year the trees are definitely in charge of my life. Autumn blows comes though, I vacuum them up with the mower and haul’um down to the huge compost pile. In a couple of years they’ll magically transform into the best mulch money could buy. The garden loves it, but getting the process started is what I’m painting about today. Maybe paying homage to them will hasten the process.

Got to run. Leaves are awaitin’.

If you’re interested in this original mixed media on paper, just send me an email.

Thanks for reading this week.
Larry Eifert

Click here to go to the online blog this was to.

Click here to go to our main website – packed with jigsaw puzzles, prints, interpretive portfolios and lots of other stuff.

Click here to check out what Nancy’s currently working on with her photography.

Red Alders – Lots of Details

I really liked these trees, and they were right there in the campground, so, of course the paints came out of their box. Red alder is a tree that likes streamsides and damp areas and many times they’ll come in after logging until young conifers take over – like they did here. I think they’re very beautiful trees, with various and interesting bark patterns any painter of nature would find interesting. Red alders don’t live very long – they’re old at 50 – and those rare older ones become very gnarly and shapely, bruised and battered by winter storms.

I tend to get lost in the details, so after this initial sketch was drawn, I turned the chair around so I could paint them in my mind’s eye (with considerably less detail).  There are other alder species here in the West – white alder, Sitka, mountain, speckled and several more, but red alder always have leaves that curl under just slightly along the edges.

This mixed media painting is watercolor and ink on paper, 9″ x 12″ and $125 unframed.
A dark mahogany frame with a double mat makes it a total of $150 and shipping adds just a bit more depending on your zone or if you take the frame. This is the original painting, NOT a print.
Email us for details.

Thanks for reading this week.
Larry Eifert

Click here to go to the online blog this was to.

Click here to go to our main website – packed with jigsaw puzzles, prints, interpretive portfolios and lots of other stuff.

Click here to check out what Nancy’s currently working on with her photography.